‘Back to Work’ Policy to be a significant step in empowering women

Women are super humans! They efficiently juggle between raising children, domestic duties, earning bread, and manage to do it all effortlessly. We witness women rising to top offices—take Leela Nair as CHRO of ULE and Geeta Gopinath as Chief Economist of the IMF examples—and also becoming the sarpanch in village panchayats.
Although, the potential in the middle rung still remains latent. It has long been an obligation for women to give up their dreams in the interests of their families. And it should come as no surprise to the reader that half of our population does not get ample representation in the working force. The Periodic Labour Force Survey (PLFS) 2019-20 finds out that the proportion of women in the overall labour force has dropped down to a meagre 20.7%.


In a bid to counter this disproportion, Rajasthan CM Ashok Gehlot recently announced the launch of a ‘Back to Work’ scheme on 30 November, during the discussion on the Finance and Appropriation Bill for the Budget 2021-22.
The policy attempts to bring back into the workforce the women who have had to quit their jobs in the past due to personal or family obligations. A three-year target of providing 15,000 regular/work-from-home jobs with the assistance of the private sector has been set, wherein priority will be accorded to women who have been abandoned,widowed, divorced or subjected to violence. Additionally, skill training will also be provided through Rajasthan Knowledge Corporation Limited (RKCL) to make them more employable.
Recently, Tata Consultancy Services also grabbed the headlines with its recent launch of a recruitment drive to hire more women professionals, followed by other IT majors like Wipro, Infosys and HCL.
The participation of women in urban areas is still encouraging, but overall participation is far from desirable. This policy raises the prospect of bolstering the financial status of vulnerable women and children. More women employees are not only good for gender equality, but they also create stronger national economies.
Besides, more participation of women in the workforce would help India achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly SDG 1 on ending poverty, SDG 5 on achieving gender equality, SDG 8 on ensuring economic growth and SDG 10 on reducing inequalities. More women in the workforce is a win-win situation for all.

Remembering bell hooks, the undaunted feminist

“I will not have my life narrowed down. I will not bow down to somebody else’s whim or to someone else’s ignorance.”

The world still mourns the incalculable loss of an inimitable author, professor and activist, bell hooks. The impact of her works that range from gender, race, class to education and critical pedagogy could clearly be felt as people from all corners of the world took to social media, expressing their grief and paying tribute.
Born as Gloria Jean Watkins, she borrowed the pen name “bell hooks” from her maternal great-grandmother, Bell Blair Hooks. Some of us might wonder, “why did she prefer writing her name in lowercase?” Well, there were alot of reasons for it, this is how she explained it herself – “Many of us took the names of our female ancestors — bell hooks is my maternal great grandmother — to honor them and debunk the notion that we were these unique, exceptional women. We wanted to say, actually, we were the products of the women who’d gone before us,” she expressed in an interview with Randy Lowens in 2009. “I think it’s more important that you read my work, reflect on it, and allow it to transform your life and your thinking in some way,” she added.


Her spirit was truly unmatched, her writings sparked every soul it reached, her critical perspectives made us all wander into the path less taken and her words so powerful that they moved us all, irrespective of whatever race, gender, caste and class one was born into.
Her legacy has initiated conversations around almost every social issue and she will always be remembered for what she lived for; a black woman not afraid to call out the perpetual system of oppression and class domination, a radical feminist who was ready to shake the pre-existing feminist notions built around prejudices and exclusion, an educationist who asserted the importance of allowing students to question the dominant ideologies instead of becoming passive recepients in the classroom and an author who reminds us that we can be a part of a loving community. (All About Love, 2000)
HER WORLD INDIA celebrates bell hooks for her nonpareil boldness, authenticity and uniqueness.

ONGC GETS IT FIRST FEMALE CHAIRPERSON: ALKA MITTAL

Alka Mittal who has previously served as ONGC’s Director of Human Resources, has created history by becoming the first female interim chairman and managing director of ONGC. The position was previously filled by Subash Kumar, who recently retired on 31 December. Mittal is also the first woman to hold the post of a full-time director on the board of ONGC. ONGC leads the country’s oil and gas production industry. Mittal’s appointment is greatly significant for this male-dominated industry, which has never seen a female chairperson before. Previously, When Nishi Vasudeva took over the reins of Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Ltd, an oil refiner and fuel marketing company, in 2014, she became the first woman to lead an oil company (HPCL).


Alka Mittal graduated from Delhi’s Jamia Millia Islamia in 2001 with a PhD in business/commerce and corporate governance. In 1983, she graduated from Dehradun’s M.K.P.P.G College with a master’s degree in economics. As her work as director of Human resources, Mittal has played a leading role in encouraging and ensuring a safe working space for women employees of the company. She is also recognised for implementing the ONGC’s National Apprenticeship Promotion Scheme (NAPS), which involved over 5000 apprentices across all work centres. Mittal will superannuate in August-end or until the appointment of a regular incumbent to the post is done.

#saluting_Women_in_Leadership

Mirabai Chanu Makes India Proud, Scripts History At Tokyo Olympics 2020

Saikhom Mirabai Chanu wins SILVER in women’s 49kg weightlifting

Saikhom Mirabai Chanu was born on 8th August 1994 in Nongpok Kakching, Imphal, Manipur, to a Meitei family.

She is an Indian weightlifter, Coached by Vijay Sharma. She won the silver medal at Tokyo Olympics 2020 in Women’s 49 kg, thereby bringing India its first medal in the event. By winning the silver medal on the first day of #TokyoOlympics2020 Mirabai Chanu has made India and Indians extremely proud and joyful.

Soon after winning the silver medal on the first day of #TokyoOlympics2020, Chanu has dedicated her victory to her country and its people, She mentioned the sacrifices made by her mother and the support of her family, She thanked her coach and supporting staff for their hard work, motivation and training. She has extended her heartfelt appreciation to the Government, Ministry of Sports, SAI, IOA, Weightlifting Federation of India, Railways, OGQ, sponsors, her community, and marketing agency IOS for their support and encouragement in her journey.

A regular presence in international events since 2014 in the 48 kg category, Chanu has won the World Championships and multiple medals at the Commonwealth Games, Glasgow; her biggest achievement came in 2017 when She won the gold medal at World Weightlifting Championships held in Anaheim, United States; She went on to break the games record on route to the gold medal at the 2018 edition of the event held in Gold Coast. She was awarded the Padma Shri by the Government of India for her contributions to the sport. She was awarded the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna award by the Government of India in 2018.

Belonging to a humble family in Manipur, Mirabai practiced rigorously to make her dream true. For someone who suffered hardships and economic challenges at home, Mirabai’s wish included bringing joy and resources to the family, especially her mother. Her family and entire neighbourhood watched her live on TV winning the game.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Sports Minister Anurag Thakur, and Congress Leader Rahul Gandhi and several other leaders have congratulated Mirabai for bringing joy to so many Indians.

The region of North East has produced some brilliant players, especially women who have brought laurels to the Country.

Mary Kom is one of them, the first Indian female boxer to win a gold medal in the Asian Games in 2014 at Incheon, South Korea, and is the first Indian female boxer to win gold at the 2018 Commonwealth Games. She is also the only boxer to become Asian Amateur Boxing Champion for a record six times. She clinched a bronze medal in the 51 kg category in 2012. She had to face many obstacles during her journey, including hunger and gender bias. But all that never deterred her willpower. She broke the stereotype that married women especially mothers cannot become successful athletes, through her grit and determination.

Mary Kom was one of the recipients of the Padma Shri in 2006 while in 2013, She was honored with the Padma Bhushan. Meanwhile, earlier in 2020, the Indian government conferred the Padma Vibhushan, the second-highest civilian award, on the Manipuri ace.

India wishes Saikhom Mirabai Chanu all the best.